Adverse health teen dating violence

The study controlled for pubertal development, child maltreatment history and a range of socio-demographic factors."In addition to clarifying potential long-term impacts of teen dating violence victimization, our study highlights the importance of talking to all adolescents about dating and dating violence," Exner-Cortens said."This includes prioritizing teen dating violence screening during clinical visits and developing health care-based interventions for responding to adolescents who are in unhealthy relationships, in order to help reduce future health problems in these teens."Study co-authors are John Eckenrode, Cornell professor of human development and director of the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research, and Emily Rothman at the Boston University School of Public Health. Article Silverman JG, Raj A, Mucci LA, Hathaway JE. Pub Med Article Lormand DK, Markham CM, Peskin MF, et al. Pub Med Article Foshee VA, Reyes HLM, Gottfredson NC, Chang LY, Ennett ST. Pub Med Article Bonomi AE, Anderson ML, Nemeth J, Bartle-Haring S, Buettner C, Schipper D. Pub Med Article Swahn MH, Simon TR, Arias I, Bossarte RM. Pub Med Article Jouriles EN, Garrido E, Rosenfield D, Mc Donald R. Pub Med Article Wolfe DA, Scott K, Reitzel-Jaffe D, Wekerle C, Grasley C, Straatman AL. Pub Med Article Vagi KJ, Rothman EF, Latzman NE, Tharp AT, Hall DM, Breiding MJ. Pub Med Article Coker AL, Mc Keown RE, Sanderson M, Davis KE, Valois RF, Huebner ES. Pub Med Article Halpern CT, Oslak SG, Young ML, Martin SL, Kupper LL. Pub Med Article Foshee VA, Bauman KE, Linder F, Rice J, Wilcher R. Pub Med Article Foshee VA, Reyes HLM, Gottfredson NC, Chang LY, Ennett ST. Pub Med Article Chapman C, Laird J, Ifill N, Kewal Ramani A; US Dept of Education.

Importance of Surveillance Data collected and interpreted through public health surveillance support efforts to prevent IPV.

CDC uses the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS)* to collect information on nonfatal IPV.

Among females who experienced rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner, 22.4% experienced some form of IPV for the first time at age 11–17 years, 47.1% at age 18–24 years, and 21.1% at age 25–34 years.

Among males who experienced rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner, 15.0% experienced some form of IPV for the first time at age 11–17 year, 38.6% at age 18–24 years, and 30.6% at age 25–34 years (Figure) (2).

These reports are based on grand rounds presentations at CDC on high-profile issues in public health science, practice, and policy.

Information about CDC Grand Rounds is available at Spivak, MD (Author affiliations at end of text) Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious, and preventable, public health problem in the United States.

In 2010, IPV contributed to 1,295 deaths, accounting for 10% of all homicides for that year (3).

The combined medical, mental health, and lost productivity costs of IPV against women are estimated to exceed .3 billion per year (4).

On average, 24 persons per minute are victims of rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner in the United States (2).

These numbers underestimate the problem because many victims do not report IPV to police, friends, or families.

Women also are more likely to experience severe physical (24.3%) and sexual violence from a partner, and twice as likely to be killed (2,5).